Flight Vehicle Aerodynamics Mark Drela

Pages 304
Views 143
Size 7.2 MiB
Downloads 17
Flight Vehicle Aerodynamics Mark Drela

Contents

Preface xv
Nomenclature xvii
1 Physics of Aerodynamic Flows 1
1.1 Atmospheric Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.2 Ideal-Gas Thermodynamic Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.3 Conservation Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.3.1 Mass, momentum, energy fluxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.3.2 Volume forces, work rate, heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.3.3 Surface forces, work rate, heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.3.4 Integral conservation laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.4 DifferentialConservation Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.4.1 Divergence forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.4.2 Convective forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.4.3 Surface boundary conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.5 Units andParameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.5.1 Unit systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.5.2 Non-dimensionalization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.5.3 Unsteady-flowparameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.5.4 High Reynolds number flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.5.5 Standard coefficients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.6 Adiabatic Flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1.7 Isentropic Flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.7.1 Requirements for isentropy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.7.2 Isentropic relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
1.7.3 Speed of sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
1.7.4 Total pressure and density . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
1.8 Low Speed and Incompressible Flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1.9 Vorticity Transport and Irrotationality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1.9.1 Helmholtz vorticity transport equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1.9.2 Crocco relation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.9.3 Bernoulli equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.10 Aerodynamic Flow Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2 Flow-Field Modeling 23
2.1 Vector Field Representation Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.2 Velocity / Vorticity-Source Duality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.3 Aerodynamic Modeling – Vorticity and Source Lumping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.3.1 Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.3.2 Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.3.3 Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.3.4 2Dforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.4 3DVortexSheetStrengthDivergenceConstraint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2.5 Equivalence of Vortex and Doublet Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
2.6 Integral Velocity / Vorticity-Source Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2.7 Velocity-Potential Integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.7.1 3Dpotentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.7.2 2Dpotentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.8 PhysicalRequirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
2.8.1 Sources in incompressible flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.8.2 Sources in compressible flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.8.3 Vorticity in high Reynolds number flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
2.9 Flow-FieldModelingwithSource andVortexSheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
2.9.1 Source sheet applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
2.9.2 Vortex sheet applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
2.10 ModelingNon-uniqueness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
2.11 2DFar-FieldApproximations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
2.11.1 2D source and vortex distribution far-field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
2.11.2 Far-field effect of lift and drag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
2.11.3 Far-field effect of thickness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
2.11.4 Far-field effect of lift’s pitching moment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
2.11.5 Doublet orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
2.11.6 2Dfar-field observations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
2.12 3DFar-Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
2.12.1 3Dfar-field effect of drag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
2.12.2 3Dfar-field effect of volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
3 Viscous Effects in Aerodynamic Flows 47
3.1 Inviscid FlowModel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
3.2 Displacement Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
3.2.1 Normalmassfluxmatching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
3.2.2 Normalmassflux inrealflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
3.3 Improved Inviscid FlowModels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
3.3.1 Displacement Body model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
3.3.2 WallTranspirationmodel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
3.3.3 Wakemodeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
3.3.4 Improved flowmodel advantages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
3.4 Viscous Decambering Stall Mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
3.5 Considerations inFlowModel Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4 Boundary Layer Analysis 57
4.1 Boundary Layer Flow Features and Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4.2 Defect Integrals and Thicknesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.2.1 Massflowcomparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.2.2 Momentumand kinetic energy flowcomparisons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.2.3 Other integral thickness interpretations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
4.3 Boundary Layer Governing Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4.3.1 ThinShearLayer approximations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4.3.2 Boundary layer equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4.3.3 Characteristics of turbulent boundary layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
4.4 Boundary Layer Response to Pressure and Shear Gradients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
4.5 Integral Boundary Layer Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
4.5.1 Integralmomentumequation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
4.5.2 Integral kinetic energy equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
4.5.3 Integral defect evolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
4.5.4 Integral defect / profile drag relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
4.6 Self-Similar Laminar Boundary Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.6.1 Wedgeflows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.7 Self-Similar Turbulent Boundary Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
4.8 Axisymmetric Boundary Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
4.9 3D Boundary Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
4.9.1 Streamwise and crossflowprofiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
4.9.2 Infinite sweptwing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
4.9.3 Crossflowgradient effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
4.10 2D Boundary Layer Solution Methods – Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
4.10.1 Classical boundary layer problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
4.10.2 Finite-difference solution methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
4.10.3 Integral solution methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
4.11 Integral Boundary Layer Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
4.11.1 Thwaitesmethod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
4.11.2 White’s equilibrium method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
4.11.3 Two-equation methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
4.11.4 Viscous dissipation relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
4.12 Coupling of Potential Flow and Boundary Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
4.12.1 Classical solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
4.12.2 Viscous/inviscid coupling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
4.13 ProfileDragPrediction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
4.13.1 Wetted-area methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
4.13.2 Local-friction and local-dissipation methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
4.13.3 Boundary layer calculation methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
4.14 Transition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
4.14.1 Transition types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
4.14.2 TS-wave natural transition prediction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
4.14.3 Influence of shape parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
4.14.4 Transitional separation bubbles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
5 Aerodynamic Force Analysis 99
5.1 Near-Field Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
5.1.1 Force definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
5.1.2 Near-field force calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
5.2 Far-FieldForces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
5.3 Flow-Field Idealization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
5.4 WakePotential Jump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
5.5 Lifting-Line Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
5.6 Idealized Far-FieldDrag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
5.6.1 Profile drag relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
5.6.2 Trefftz-plane velocities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
5.6.3 Induced drag relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
5.7 Idealized Far-FieldLift andSideforce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
5.8 TrefftzPlane IntegralEvaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
5.8.1 Fourier seriesmethod forflatwake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
6.6.5 Cambered body of revolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
6.6.6 Limits of slender-body theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
6.6.7 Vortex lift models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
7 Unsteady Aerodynamic Flows 143
7.1 Unsteady Flow-Field Representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
7.2 Unsteady Potential Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
7.3 GoverningEquations forUnsteady Potential Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
7.3.1 Pressure calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
7.4 Potential Jump ofUnsteadyVortexSheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
7.4.1 Potential-jump convection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
7.4.2 Shed vorticity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
7.5 Unsteady FlowCategories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
7.6 Unsteady PanelMethod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
7.6.1 Sources of unsteadiness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
7.6.2 Wake convection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
7.6.3 Panelmethod formulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
7.7 Unsteady 2D Airfoil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
7.7.1 Geometric relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
7.7.2 Problemformulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
7.7.3 Canonical impulse solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
7.7.4 Generalmotion solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
7.7.5 Apparentmass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
7.7.6 Sinusoidalmotion solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
8 Compressible Aerodynamic Flows 159
8.1 Effects of Compressibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
8.1.1 Compressibility definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
8.1.2 Flow-field changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
8.1.3 Transonic flowand shockwaves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
8.1.4 Flow-field representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
8.2 Compressible Flow Quantities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
8.2.1 Stagnation quantities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
8.2.2 Isentropic static density and pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
8.3 ShockWaves andWaveDrag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
8.4 Compressible Potential Flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
8.4.1 Full potential equation – problemformulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
8.4.2 Full potential solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
8.4.3 Limitations of full potential solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
8.5 Small-Disturbance Compressible Flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
8.5.1 Perturbation velocities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
8.5.2 Small-disturbance approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
8.5.3 Second-order approximations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
8.5.4 Perturbation potential flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
8.5.5 Ranges of validity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
8.6 Prandtl-Glauert Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
8.6.1 Prandtl-Glauert interpretation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
8.6.2 Prandtl-Glauert transformation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
8.6.3 Prandtl-Glauert equation solution procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
8.7 Subsonic Compressible Far-Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
8.7.1 Far-field definition approaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
8.7.2 Compressible 2D far-field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
8.7.3 Compressible 3D far-field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
8.8 Small-Disturbance Supersonic Flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
8.8.1 Supersonic flowanalysis problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
8.8.2 2D supersonic airfoil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
8.8.3 Canonical supersonic flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
8.8.4 Supersonic singularities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
8.8.5 Wave drag of arbitrary slender bodies of revolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
8.8.6 Supersonic lifting flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
8.9 Transonic Flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
8.9.1 Onset of transonic flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
8.9.2 TSDequation analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
8.9.3 Transonic airfoils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
9 Introduction to Flight Dynamics 201
9.1 Frames ofReference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
9.2 AxisSystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
9.3 Body Position and Rate Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
9.4 AxisParameterization andConventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
9.5 FlowAngles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
9.6 AircraftKinematicRelations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
9.6.1 Aircraft position rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
9.6.2 Aircraft orientation rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
9.7 DynamicsRelations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
9.7.1 Linearmomentum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
9.7.2 Angular momentum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
9.8 FlightDynamics Formulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
9.8.1 Variable and vector definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
9.8.2 General equations ofmotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
9.8.3 Linearized equations ofmotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
9.8.4 Natural response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
9.8.5 Symmetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
9.9 Aerodynamic Force and Moment Linearizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
9.10 Stability Derivative Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
9.11 LongitudinalDynamicsSubset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
9.11.1 Phugoid approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
9.11.2 Short-period approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
9.12 LateralDynamicsSubset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
9.12.1 Roll-subsidence approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
9.12.2 Spiral approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
9.12.3 Dutch-roll approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
9.13 Stability Derivative Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
9.13.1 Component derivatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
9.13.2 Longitudinal derivatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
9.13.3 Lateral derivatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
10 Flow-Field and Force Measurement 221
10.1 Wind Tunnel Methods – Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
10.2 Direct Force Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
10.2.1 Force component definitions and rotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
10.2.2 Drag measurement error sensitivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
10.2.3 Uncorrected coefficients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
10.3 Wind Tunnel Corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
10.3.1 2D solid-wall boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
10.3.2 2D open-jet boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
10.3.3 3D tunnel images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
10.3.4 3D solid-wall boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
10.3.5 3D open-jet boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
10.4 2D tunnel drag measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
10.4.1 Flow two-dimensionality requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
10.4.2 Wake momentum drag measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
A Vector Notation 241
A.1 Vector and Matrix Multiplication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
A.2 Scalar andVectorDerivativeOperations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
A.3 Matrix Derivative Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
B Sheet Jump Relations 243
C 2D Airfoil Far-Field Lift and Drag 245
C.1 Far-FieldModel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
C.2 OuterContour Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
C.3 MassConservation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
C.4 MomentumConservation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
C.5 Far-Field Lift/Span . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
C.6 Far-FieldDrag/Span . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
D Extended Thin Airfoil Theory 251
D.1 Geometry andProblemFormulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
D.2 First-Order Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
D.2.1 Source-sheet solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
D.2.2 Vortex-sheet solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
D.3 First-Order Force andMomentCalculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
D.4 Second-Order Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
D.4.1 General case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
D.4.2 Flat elliptical-thickness airfoil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
E Prandtl Lifting-Line Wing Theory 259
E.1 Lifting-Line Formulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
E.2 FourierSolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
E.3 ForceCalculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
E.4 Elliptical Planform Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
E.4.1 Twisted elliptical wing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
E.4.2 Flat elliptical wing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
F Axis Transformations and Rotations 265
F.1 AxisTransformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
F.2 AxisRotationRelations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266

Preface

Objective

This book is intended as a general reference for the physics, concepts, theories, and models underlying
the discipline of aerodynamics. An overarching theme is the technique of velocity field representation and
modeling via source and vorticity fields, and via their sheet, filament, or point-singularity idealizations.
These models provide an intuitive feel for aerodynamic flow behavior, and are also the basis of aerodynamic
force analysis, drag decomposition, flow interference estimation, wind tunnel corrections, computational
methods, and many other important applications.
This book covers some topics in depth, while offering introductions or summaries of others. In particular,
Chapters 3,4 on Boundary Layers, Chapter 7 on Unsteady Aerodynamics, and Chapter 9 on Flight Dynamics
are intended as introductions and overviews of those topics, which deserve to be properly treated in separate
dedicated texts. Similarly, there are only glancing mentions of the related topic of Propulsion, which is its
own discipline.
Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and computational methods in general are indispensable for today’s
practicing aerodynamicist. Hence a few computational methods are described here, primarily the vortex lattice
and panel methods which are based on the source and vorticity flow-field representation. The main goal
is to provide improved understanding of the concepts and physical models which underlie such methods.
Most of this book is based on the lecture notes, handouts, and reference materials which have been developed
for the course Flight Vehicle Aerodynamics (course number 16.110) taught by the author at MIT’s
Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. This course is intended for first-year graduate students, but
has also attracted a significant number of advanced undergraduates.

Preparation

This book assumes that the reader is well versed in basic physics and vector calculus, and already has had
exposure to basic fluid mechanics and aerodynamics. Hence, little or no space is devoted to introduction or
discussion of basic concepts such as fluid velocity, density, pressure, viscosity, stress, etc. Chapter 1 on the
Physics of Aerodynamics Flows is intentionally concise, since it is intended primarily as a reference for the
underlying physical principles and governing equations of fluid flows rather than as a first introduction to
these topics. The author’s course at MIT begins with Chapter 2.
Some familiarity with aerodynamics and aeronautics terminology is assumed on the part of the reader. However,
a summary of advanced vector calculus notation is given in Appendix A, since this is not commonly
seen in basic vector calculus texts.

Acknowledgments

The author would like to thank Doug McLean, Alejandra Uranga, and Harold Youngren for their extensive
comments, suggestions, and proofreading of this book. It has benefited considerably from their input. Ed
Greitzer, and Bob Liebeck have also provided comments and useful feedback on earlier drafts, and helped
steer the book towards its final form. Also very helpful have been the comments, suggestions, and error
corrections from the numerous students who have taken the Flight Vehicle Aerodynamics course at MIT.