Direct Energy Conversion by Andrea M. Mitofsky

Pages 385
Views 331
Size 5.4 MiB
Downloads 58
Direct Energy Conversion by Andrea M. Mitofsky

Contents

Contents i
1 Introduction 1
1.1 What is Direct Energy Conversion? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.2 Preview of Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.3 Conservation of Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.4 Measures of Power and Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.5 Properties of Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1.5.1 Macroscopic Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1.5.2 Microscopic Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.6 Electromagnetic Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
1.6.1 Maxwell’s Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
1.6.2 Electromagnetic Waves in Free Space . . . . . . . . . 17
1.6.3 Electromagnetic Waves in Materials . . . . . . . . . 18
1.7 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
I Survey of Energy Conversion Devices 23
2 Capacitors and Piezoelectric Devices 23
2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.2 Capacitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.2.1 Material Polarization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.2.2 Energy Storage in Capacitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.2.3 Permittivity and Related Measures . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.2.4 Capacitor Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2.3 Piezoelectric Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2.3.1 Piezoelectric Strain Constant . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.3.2 Piezoelectricity in Crystalline Materials . . . . . . . 33
2.3.3 Piezoelectricity in Amorphous and Polycrystalline Materials
and Ferroelectricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
2.3.4 Materials Used to Make Piezoelectric Devices . . . . 43
2.3.5 Applications of Piezoelectricity . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
2.4 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
3 Pyroelectrics and Electro-Optics 53
3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
3.2 Pyroelectricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
3.2.1 Pyroelectricity in Crystalline Materials . . . . . . . . 53
ii CONTENTS
3.2.2 Pyroelectricity in Amorphous and Polycrystalline Materials
and Ferroelectricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
3.2.3 Materials and Applications of Pyroelectric Devices . 55
3.3 Electro-Optics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
3.3.1 Electro-Optic Coecients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
3.3.2 Electro-Optic Eect in Crystalline Materials . . . . . 59
3.3.3 Electro-Optic Eect in Amorphous and Polycrystalline
Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
3.3.4 Applications of Electro-Optics . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
3.4 Notation Quagmire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
3.5 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
4 Antennas 67
4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
4.2 Electromagnetic Radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
4.2.1 Superposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
4.2.2 Reciprocity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
4.2.3 Near Field and Far Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.2.4 Environmental Eects on Antennas . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.3 Antenna Components and Denitions . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
4.4 Antenna Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
4.4.1 Frequency and Bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
4.4.2 Impedance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
4.4.3 Directivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
4.4.4 Electromagnetic Polarization . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
4.4.5 Other Antenna Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
4.5 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
5 Hall Eect 91
5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
5.2 Physics of the Hall Eect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
5.3 Magnetohydrodynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
5.4 Quantum Hall Eect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
5.5 Applications of Hall Eect Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
5.6 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
6 Photovoltaics 101
6.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
6.2 The Wave and Particle Natures of Light . . . . . . . . . . . 101
6.3 Semiconductors and Energy Level Diagrams . . . . . . . . . 104
6.3.1 Semiconductor Denitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
CONTENTS iii
6.3.2 Energy Levels in Isolated Atoms and in Semiconductors106
6.3.3 Denitions of Conductors, Dielectrics, and Semiconductors
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
6.3.4 Why Are Solar Cells and Photodetectors Made from
Semiconductors? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
6.3.5 Electron Energy Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
6.4 Crystallography Revisited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
6.4.1 Real Space and Reciprocal Space . . . . . . . . . . . 119
6.4.2 E versus k Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
6.5 Pn Junctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
6.6 Solar Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
6.6.1 Solar Cell Eciency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
6.6.2 Solar Cell Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
6.6.3 Solar Cell Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
6.7 Photodetectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
6.7.1 Types of Photodetectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
6.7.2 Measures of Photodetectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
6.8 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
7 Lamps, LEDs, and Lasers 139
7.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
7.2 Absorption, Spontaneous Emission, Stimulated Emission . . 139
7.2.1 Absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
7.2.2 Spontaneous Emission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
7.2.3 Stimulated Emission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
7.2.4 Rate Equations and Einstein Coecients . . . . . . . 143
7.3 Devices Involving Spontaneous Emission . . . . . . . . . . . 147
7.3.1 Incandescent Lamps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
7.3.2 Gas Discharge Lamps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
7.3.3 LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
7.4 Devices Involving Stimulated Emission . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
7.4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
7.4.2 Laser Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
7.4.3 Laser Eciency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
7.4.4 Laser Bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
7.4.5 Laser Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
7.4.6 Optical Ampliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
7.5 Relationship Between Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
7.6 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
iv CONTENTS
8 Thermoelectrics 173
8.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
8.2 Thermodynamic Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
8.3 Bulk Modulus and Related Measures . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
8.4 Ideal Gas Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
8.5 First Law of Thermodynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
8.6 Thermoelectric Eects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
8.6.1 Three Related Eects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
8.6.2 Electrical Conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
8.6.3 Thermal Conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
8.6.4 Figure of Merit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
8.7 Thermoelectric Eciency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
8.7.1 Carnot Eciency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
8.7.2 Other Factors That Aect Eciency . . . . . . . . . 191
8.8 Applications of Thermoelectrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
8.9 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
9 Batteries and Fuel Cells 201
9.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
9.2 Measures of the Ability of Charges to Flow . . . . . . . . . 202
9.2.1 Electrical Conductivity, Fermi Energy Level, and Energy
Gap Revisited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
9.2.2 Mulliken Electronegativity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
9.2.3 Chemical Potential and Electronegativity . . . . . . 205
9.2.4 Chemical Hardness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
9.2.5 Redox Potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
9.2.6 pH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
9.3 Charge Flow in Batteries and Fuel Cells . . . . . . . . . . . 211
9.3.1 Battery Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
9.3.2 Charge Flow in a Discharging Battery . . . . . . . . 212
9.3.3 Charge Flow in a Charging Battery . . . . . . . . . . 213
9.3.4 Charge Flow in Fuel Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
9.4 Measures of Batteries and Fuel Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
9.4.1 Cell Voltage, Specic Energy, and Related Measures 216
9.4.2 Practical Voltage and Eciency . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
9.5 Battery Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
9.5.1 Battery Variety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
9.5.2 Lead Acid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
9.5.3 Alkaline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
9.5.4 Nickel Metal Hydride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
9.5.5 Lithium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
CONTENTS v
9.6 Fuel Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
9.6.1 Components of Fuel Cells and Fuel Cell Systems . . . 229
9.6.2 Types and Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
9.6.3 Practical Considerations of Fuel Cells . . . . . . . . . 232
9.7 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
10 Miscellaneous Energy Conversion Devices 237
10.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
10.2 Thermionic Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
10.3 Radiation Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
10.4 Biological Energy Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
10.5 Resistive Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
10.6 Electrouidics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
II Theoretical Ideas 245
11 Calculus of Variations 245
11.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
11.2 Lagrangian and Hamiltonian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
11.3 Principle of Least Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
11.4 Derivation of the Euler-Lagrange Equation . . . . . . . . . 249
11.5 Mass Spring Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
11.6 Capacitor Inductor Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
11.7 Schrödinger’s Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
11.8 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
12 Relating Energy Conversion Processes 269
12.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
12.2 Electrical Energy Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
12.3 Mechanical Energy Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
12.4 Thermodynamic Energy Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
12.5 Chemical Energy Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
12.6 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
13 Thomas Fermi Analysis 291
13.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
13.2 Preliminary Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
13.2.1 Derivatives and Integrals of Vectors in Spherical Coordinates
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
13.2.2 Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
13.2.3 Reciprocal Space Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
vi CONTENTS
13.3 Derivation of the Lagrangian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
13.4 Deriving the Thomas Fermi Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
13.5 From Thomas Fermi Theory to Density Functional Theory . 308
13.6 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
14 Lie Analysis 311
14.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
14.1.1 Assumptions and Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312
14.2 Types of Symmetries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
14.2.1 Discrete versus Continuous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
14.2.2 Regular versus Dynamical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314
14.2.3 Geometrical versus Nongeometrical . . . . . . . . . . 314
14.3 Continuous Symmetries and Innitesimal Generators . . . . 315
14.3.1 Denition of Innitesimal Generator . . . . . . . . . 315
14.3.2 Innitesimal Generators of the Wave Equation . . . . 316
14.3.3 Concepts of Group Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
14.4 Derivation of the Innitesimal Generators . . . . . . . . . . 322
14.4.1 Procedure to Find Innitesimal Generators . . . . . . 322
14.4.2 Thomas Fermi Equation Example . . . . . . . . . . . 323
14.4.3 Line Equation Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
14.5 Invariants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
14.5.1 Importance of Invariants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
14.5.2 Noether’s Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
14.5.3 Derivation of Noether’s Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . 331
14.5.4 Line Equation Invariants Example . . . . . . . . . . . 333
14.5.5 Pendulum Equation Invariants Example . . . . . . . 334
14.6 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336
14.7 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
Appendices 341
A. Variable List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341
B. Select Units of Measure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
C. Overloaded Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
D. Specic Energies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
References 355
Index 370
About the Book 374
About the Author 374